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British Motorcycles

Sun Motorcycles for the 1920-1921 Season

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Sun-Vitesse Ladies 1920.

The Sun-Vitesse two-stroke illustrated is one of several lightweights intended for the use of ladies.

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Sun-Vitesse Engine 1920

Section of the Sun-Vitesse two-stroke engine. A recess is cut in the crank case to provide lubrication for the roller bearing and main shaft.

Olympia Show 1920

Sun. (Stand 65.)

  • 2½ h.p.; 70x70 mm. (259 c.c); single-cylinder two-stroke; drip feed lubrication; B. and B. carburetter; T.B. chain-driven magneto; two-speed Sturmey-Archer gear; chain and belt drive; 26x2¼ in. tyres.

The Sun Cycle and Fittings Co., Ltd., Aston Brook Street, Birmingham.

Sun-Vitesse motor cycles are lightweight machines which really are light, and therefore are handy for the hundred and one small journeys that are often necessary. The principal changes in the design for this year are the extra roller bearing inside the crank case on the crankshaft, the rollers being caged by chain links, the four-point suspension for the crank case, wider mudguards and forks, a larger tank, and larger toolbags.

This list gives some idea of the experimental work undergone during the past season. It will be remembered that the Vitesse engine has a one-piece crank case, whereby joints which may constitute air leaks, a serious matter for crank case compression, are avoided; the additional power and capacity to "rev" being put down largely to this feature.

On the stand, beside the ordinary touring models, there is exhibited a neat little ladies' machine in the Show which has a dropped frame to make it a suitable mount, the design requiring little alteration to produce this result. There is also a neat little light sidecar outfit, and one of the models has the new Maglita set. So many, indeed the vast majority of two-strokes, are built-up with proprietary engines that it is refreshing to turn to such a stand as the Sun, where the inclined immediately premises originality.

Olympia Show, 1920

The Motor Cycle, December 2nd, 1920.