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Hungarian Motorcycles

Motorcycles, Mopeds and Scooters Made in Hungary

Notes on some of the rarer Hungarian marques

This page lists brands of which little historical information is currently available.
For a more complete listing visit the Hungarian Index.


Agil
Imre Pajor built Agil three-wheelers using 350cc JAP engines (1927-1928), and the Népmotor was sold by the firm. A 1939 example of distinctly German appearance is an exhibit at the Budapest Transport Museum.
The company obtained the rights to build Zündapp in Hungary in 1935 and produced Zundapp 200 and 250cc models until 1937. What happened then is unclear, but the name Imre Pajor appears in the Holocaust records as a survivor. Pál Négyesi, on the other hand, says that he died during military service.
Sources: magyarjarmu.hu, origo.hu/motor


Gaia
The Gaia began as a homebuilt during a period when it was nigh on impossible to develop a project in Hungary. After some decades it grew into a fine business building quality machines powered by Malaguti and Franco Morini engines.
For more information visit gaiamotors.hu

Source: Article at magyarjarmu.hu by Pál Négyesi


Gujdar
Manufactured by József Gujdár in Kispesten, Budapest, 1923
A bicycle attachment engine produced in very small quantities, it was very easy to fit and remove. There is a record of a 198cc Gu-Jo engine used in competition in 1929 by a family member.

Source: Article at magyarjarmu.hu by Pál Négyesi


KMB

Kiss Motorközpont Budapest was founded in 1927 and sold motor accessories and D-Rad motorcycles. Production of their own machines began in 1936 and continued until 1941 or 1942. A 350cc prototype was built in 1934, and by 1936 they were delivering KMB 350 machines using their own frames and engines, with a Burman 4-speed gearbox. A 98cc engine was introduced in 1941.

Source: Article at magyarjarmu.hu by Pál Négyesi




Panni

Located in Csepel (District XXI, Budapest), Panni produced mopeds powered by the 49cc VT50 engine built at Székesfehérvár's Hunting Manufactory Factory, the same engine used in the Berva.

Prototypes appeared in 1957 and production began the following year.

The Panni was similar to the Berva, with leading link front forks and undamped rear swinging arm, and quite small wheels.

Another model, the Pannikat, was slightly less basic - it had a steering lock and a speedometer.

More expensive than the Berva, the Panni did not achieve good market penetration and sales suffered.

In April 1960 production was moved to the same factory which produced the Berva, and in early 1962 production came to a halt after some 15 or 20,000 mopeds had been built, the majority in the first factory in Csepel.

Source: Article at magyarjarmu.hu by Pál Négyesi


Stadler Mihály
This motorcycle was exhibited at the 1939 Budapest International Fair. Similar to the Zunda in appearance, it was built at the former Zundapp Hungary factory and ran a 250cc JLO engine.

Source: Article at magyarjarmu.hu by Pál Négyesi


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Classic Motorcycle Fibreglass
Classic Motorcycle Fibreglass
Tanks, seats, guards and fairings for classic bikes, cafe racers and post-classic motorcycles.