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Velocette Motorcycles

Veloce and Velocette Models

1907

1907 2 H.P. Veloce

1909 2½ H.P 276cc four-stroke unit construction

1914-15 Models

1919

1919 Model D1 220cc Two-stroke

1919 Model DL1 220cc Two-stroke Ladies model

1919 Model D2 220cc Two-stroke

1919 Model DL2 220cc Two-stroke Ladies model

1920

1920 275cc Two-stroke

1920 220cc Two-stroke

1921 Model D3 3-speed gearbox, and chain drive

1922

1922 Sports Model 249cc

1922 Models DL2 D2 and D3

1922 Models E2 220cc, E3, El2 (Ladies) and ES3

1923

1923 Model G 249cc, Maglita electric lighting

1923 Model GC 249cc Colonial

1923 Models

1923 Model B 249cc 3-speed chain-drive

1924 Model A 249cc 2 two-speed belt drive

1925

1925 Model H 348cc

1925 Model E Ladies model

1925 Model AC, chain drive

1925 Model K First Velocette

1925–1938 Velocette KTT 348cc

1925-1947 KSS/KTS 348cc OHC

The KSS Super Sports and the KTS tourer were introduced in 1925, both with the same OHC engine and cycle parts, but with differing wheel sizes and more deeply valanced guards on the tourer.

MkII versions were introduced in 1936 with many changes including alloy heads with fully enclosed valve springs, a cradle frame, and Webb forks for an addition to the range, the MSS tourer. Production resumed after the war and the KSS continued. In the second half of 1947 it was offered with optional Dowty telescopic forks. It did not appear in the catalogue for the 1947/1948 season.

1927

1927 Model KS KSS with a standard engine

1927 Models

1928

1928 Model U 249cc

1928 Model KE Economy model

1928 Model KES Economy model

1928 Models

1929 Model USS

1929 Models

1930 GTP 249cc 2-stroke

1933 MOV 248cc high-cam OHV

1934 Velocette MAC 349cc OHV (Longstroke version of the MOV)

1934 Models

1935 Velocette MSS 499cc

Derived from the 350 MAC introduced the previous year, the MSS used the same 96mm stroke with a larger bore to create the 500.

The frame came from the KTT racer. After the war it was in the catalogue until 1948, and then returned in 1954 sporting swing-arm rear suspension and Velocette telescopic forks. The engine had had considerable attention, sporting an alloy head and barrel and a square bore/stroke of 86x86 mm.

1936 Models

1940 MAC (WD) 349cc

1941 MAF 349cc Military

1949-1964 Velocette LE

1951 Velocette LE 149cc

1956

1956-64 Valiant

1956 Velocette Venom 499cc Sports model

1956 Velocette Viper 349cc

1956 Velocette Valiant 200cc Flat twin

1959 Valiant Veeline 200cc Flat twin

1960 Viceroy 249cc 2-stroke scooter

1961 Velocette Voletta 192cc

1963

1963 Venom Clubman Veeline 499cc OHV single, 34 h.p. @ 6200 rpm, max speed 105 mph.

1963-68 Vogue 192cc LE

1965–1971 Velocette Thruxton 499cc

1967

1967 Viper & Venom

1967 Viper & Venom Special

1967 Thruxton

1967 Scrambler & MSS

1967 Clubman


bonhams: By the end of the 1920s Veloce’s range of K-Series roadsters boasted a host of variations on the theme that included Normal, Sports, Super Sports, Touring, Economy and twin-port models. Introduced in 1925, the KSS was the Super Sports version while the KTS tourer employed the same overhead camshaft engine in virtually identical cycle parts, differences being confined mainly to mudguard style and wheel sizes. Introduced for the 1936 season, the MkII version of the KSS/KTS represented a major redesign, featuring many improvements including a new aluminium-alloy cylinder head with enclosed valve-gear, plus the cradle frame and heavyweight Webb forks of the new MSS tourer. In this form the KSS resumed production post-war in November 1946 before being updated, together with the other road models, with (optional) Dowty Oleomatic telescopic front forks in August 1947. Expensive to produce, the KSS was dropped from the range at the year’s end.